Bolivia National Parks

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About Bolivia National Parks National Parks

Bolivia’s national parks offer a captivating journey through some of the most diverse and pristine landscapes in South America. With 22 national parks spread across the country, Bolivia boasts an incredible array of ecosystems, from the high Andes mountains to the lowland Amazon rainforest.

Each national park showcases unique features, including towering peaks, dense forests, expansive grasslands, and vibrant wildlife. From the iconic Sajama National Park, home to Bolivia’s highest peak, to the remote and biodiverse Madidi National Park, these protected areas play a crucial role in conserving Bolivia’s rich biodiversity and cultural heritage.

Visitors to Bolivia’s national parks can embark on unforgettable adventures, including trekking, wildlife watching, birding, and cultural experiences with indigenous communities. Bolivia’s national parks offer a gateway to explore the country’s natural wonders and discover its remarkable beauty and diversity.

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Bolivia National Parks's National Parks

Fern trees in Amboro National Park in Bolivia

Amboro National Park

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Madidi National Park green lake within amazon rainforest

Madidi National Park

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Sajama National Park

Sajama National Park

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Canyon in Torotoro National Park

Torotoro National Park

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FAQ’s

1. How many national parks are there in Bolivia?

Bolivia has 22 national parks. These protected areas showcase the country’s diverse landscapes, from the high Andes to the lowland Amazon rainforest, and are vital for conserving Bolivia’s rich biodiversity and cultural heritage.

2. What is the largest national park in Bolivia?

The largest national park in Bolivia is Madidi National Park (Parque Nacional Madidi). Located in the northern part of the country, in the departments of La Paz and Beni, Madidi National Park covers an area of approximately 18,958 square kilometers (about 7,321 square miles).

Established in 1995, Madidi National Park is part of the Amazon rainforest and is known for its exceptional biodiversity and pristine wilderness. The park encompasses a wide range of ecosystems, including lowland tropical rainforest, cloud forest, and Andean foothills, as well as rivers, lakes, and wetlands. It is home to thousands of plant and animal species, including jaguars, giant otters, macaws, and monkeys.

Madidi National Park is recognized for its ecological importance and serves as a crucial sanctuary for wildlife and indigenous communities. It offers visitors opportunities for ecotourism, wildlife observation, and cultural experiences, making it one of the most popular destinations for nature enthusiasts in Bolivia.

3. What is the smallest national park in Bolivia?

The smallest national park in Bolivia is the Isiboro Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory (Parque Nacional y Territorio Indígena Isiboro Sécure), often abbreviated as TIPNIS. Located in the departments of Beni and Cochabamba in the central part of Bolivia, Isiboro Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory covers an area of approximately 1,895 square kilometers (about 731 square miles).

Established in 1965, Isiboro Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory is a protected area that is jointly managed by the Bolivian government and indigenous communities. It encompasses a variety of ecosystems, including tropical rainforest, rivers, and grasslands, and is home to diverse wildlife, including jaguars, tapirs, and numerous bird species.

Despite its relatively small size compared to other national parks in Bolivia, Isiboro Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory is of great cultural and ecological significance, serving as a vital habitat for wildlife and preserving the traditional way of life of indigenous peoples in the region.

4. What was the first national park in Bolivia?

The first national park in Bolivia is Amboró National Park (Parque Nacional Amboró). Established in 1973, Amboró National Park is located in the departments of Santa Cruz, Cochabamba, and Beni in the eastern part of Bolivia. It covers an area of approximately 4,425 square kilometers (about 1,709 square miles).

Amboró National Park is known for its diverse ecosystems, including cloud forests, Yungas forests, and montane forests, as well as rivers, waterfalls, and deep canyons. The park is home to a rich variety of plant and animal species, including rare and endangered species such as the spectacled bear, jaguar, and Andean condor.

As the first national park established in Bolivia, Amboró National Park holds significant ecological and conservation value. It provides important habitat for wildlife, protects vital watersheds, and offers opportunities for scientific research, ecotourism, and outdoor recreation.